Structure for ML use cases

I have always wondered why every ML project devolves into a mess of notebooks and CSV files strewn around. There is a way out of this mess. Nothing clever here :wink:.

The answer is Cookiecutter. Read more about Cookiecutter Data Science

A logical, reasonably standardized, but flexible project structure for doing and sharing data science work.

Please note: We’re not talking about bikeshedding the indentation aesthetics or pedantic formatting standards — ultimately, data science code quality is about correctness and reproducibility.

Why use this project structure?

When we think about data analysis, we often think just about the resulting reports, insights, or visualizations. While these end products are generally the main event, it’s easy to focus on making the products look nice and ignore the quality of the code that generates them. Because these end products are created programmatically, code quality is still important! And we’re not talking about bikeshedding the indentation aesthetics or pedantic formatting standards — ultimately, data science code quality is about correctness and reproducibility.

It’s no secret that good analyses are often the result of very scattershot and serendipitous explorations. Tentative experiments and rapidly testing approaches that might not work out are all part of the process for getting to the good stuff, and there is no magic bullet to turn data exploration into a simple, linear progression.

That being said, once started it is not a process that lends itself to thinking carefully about the structure of your code or project layout, so it’s best to start with a clean, logical structure and stick to it throughout. We think it’s a pretty big win all around to use a fairly standardized setup like this one.

Project Directory Strucuture

Here is the directory structure that keeps data & code separately.

├── LICENSE
├── Makefile           <- Makefile with commands like `make data` or `make train`
├── README.md          <- The top-level README for developers using this project.
├── data
│   ├── external       <- Data from third party sources.
│   ├── interim        <- Intermediate data that has been transformed.
│   ├── processed      <- The final, canonical data sets for modeling.
│   └── raw            <- The original, immutable data dump.
│
├── docs               <- A default Sphinx project; see sphinx-doc.org for details
│
├── models             <- Trained and serialized models, model predictions, or model summaries
│
├── notebooks          <- Jupyter notebooks. Naming convention is a number (for ordering),
│                         the creator's initials, and a short `-` delimited description, e.g.
│                         `1.0-jqp-initial-data-exploration`.
│
├── references         <- Data dictionaries, manuals, and all other explanatory materials.
│
├── reports            <- Generated analysis as HTML, PDF, LaTeX, etc.
│   └── figures        <- Generated graphics and figures to be used in reporting
│
├── requirements.txt   <- The requirements file for reproducing the analysis environment, e.g.
│                         generated with `pip freeze > requirements.txt`
│
├── setup.py           <- Make this project pip installable with `pip install -e`
├── src                <- Source code for use in this project.
│   ├── __init__.py    <- Makes src a Python module
│   │
│   ├── data           <- Scripts to download or generate data
│   │   └── make_dataset.py
│   │
│   ├── features       <- Scripts to turn raw data into features for modeling
│   │   └── build_features.py
│   │
│   ├── models         <- Scripts to train models and then use trained models to make
│   │   │                 predictions
│   │   ├── predict_model.py
│   │   └── train_model.py
│   │
│   └── visualization  <- Scripts to create exploratory and results oriented visualizations
│       └── visualize.py
│
└── tox.ini            <- tox file with settings for running tox; see tox.readthedocs.io

Getting Started

With this in mind, we’ve created a data science cookiecutter template for projects in Python. Your analysis doesn’t have to be in Python, but the template does provide some Python boilerplate that you’d want to remove (in the src folder for example, and the Sphinx documentation skeleton in docs).

Requirements

  • Python 2.7 or 3.5
  • cookiecutter Python package >= 1.4.0: pip install cookiecutter

Starting a new project

Starting a new project is as easy as running this command at the command line. No need to create a directory first, the cookiecutter will do it for you.

cookiecutter https://github.com/drivendata/cookiecutter-data-science

Updated: